FAQs

Direct draw systems are typically kegerators and faucets mounted on walk-in cooler walls.

Glycol systems are typically long-draw systems, such as kegs in walk-in coolers and the tap towers at bars.
Foaming beer can be caused by a number of issues. We’ve outlined common causes and solutions below. If you follow these steps and the issue persists, please contact us at 503-730-2989.
  • The temperature could be too warm; the liquid temperature should sit at 38 degrees.
  • Your beer line could be kinked. Inspect the line to see if there are any hitches in the line.
  • The gas pressure could be too high; Co2 should be between 12-14 psi.
  • A probe tip washer is missing; check the last keg and replace if missing.
  • There could be a Co2 leak or no more Co2; for this, check the regulator in the cooler and shut-offs, as well as the Co2 tank gauges. If your tank is empty, change to a full tank. If there is a leak, please contact us and we will replace the leaking tank.
Having no beer at your faucet can be caused by a number of issues. We’ve outlined common causes and solutions below. If you follow these steps and the issue persists, please contact us at 503-730-2989.
  • The Co2 tank or keg could be empty. All you have to do for this is change to a full Co2 tank or full keg.
  • The regulator shut-off could be closed. If it appears to be off, open it up again, turning towards the ground.
  • Your Co2 main bottle could be turned off. If it appears to be off, turn the Co2 tank main valve, twisting to the open position.
  • The coupler could not be disengaged; if it looks like there is a faulty connection, re-engage the coupler by dropping the handle.
Foaming beer can be caused by a number of issues. We’ve outlined common causes and solutions below. If you follow these steps and the issue persists, please contact us at 503-730-2989.
  • The temperature could be too warm; the liquid temperature should sit at 38 degrees, and the glycol chiller should be between 28-34 degrees.
  • Your beer line could be kinked. Inspect the line to see if there are any hitches in the line.
  • The gas pressure could be too high or too low; mixed gas systems should be between 24-26 psi.
  • A probe tip washer is missing; check the last keg and replace if missing.
  • There could be a Co2 leak, or your Co2 or nitrogen could be empty. Check the regulator in the cooler and shut-offs, the gauges on the Co2 tank, the gauges on the nitro tank, and the gauges under the Green Air Machine. If any of the tanks are empty, they will need to be refilled. If there is a leak, please contact us and we will replace the leaking tanks.
Having no beer at your faucet can be caused by a number of issues. We’ve outlined common causes and solutions below. If you follow these steps and the issue persists, please contact us at 503-730-2989.
  • The Co2 or nitrogen tanks could be empty. All you have to do for this is change to a full Co2 tank or full nitrogen tank.
  • Your keg could also potentially be empty, and all you’ll need to do is change to a full keg.
  • The regulator shut-off could be closed. If it appears to be off, open it up again, turning towards the ground.
  • Your Co2 main bottle or bulk tank could be turned off. If it appears to be off, turn the Co2 tank main valve, twisting to the open position.
  • The coupler could not be disengaged; if it looks like the coupler is disengaged, re-engage it by dropping the handle.
  • Your Foam on Beer Detector (FOB) could have dropped down. Check to see if the float is up or if it has dropped to the bottom. If it has dropped and the keg is full, the FOB may need to be reset. If the keg is empty, replace the keg and reset the FOB.
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